VoIP part 3: Circuit Switching

Existing phone systems are driven by a very reliable but somewhat inefficient method for connecting calls called circuit switching.
Circuit switching is a very basic concept that has been used by telephone networks for wee over 100 years. When a call is made between two parties, the connection is maintained for the duration of the call. Because you’re connecting two points in both directions, the connection is called a circuit. This is the foundation of the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).

This how a typical telephone call works:
1. You pick up the receiver and listen for a dial tone. This lets you know that you have a connection to the local office of your telephone carrier.
2. You dial the number of the party you wish to talk to.
3. The call is routed through the switch at your local exchange to the party you are calling.
4. A connection is made between your telephone and the other party’s line using several interconnected switches along the way.
5. The phone you are calling rings, and someone answers.
6. The circuit opens.
7. You talk for a period of time and then hang up.
8. Hanging up, causes the circuit to close, freeing your line and all the lines in between.

Let’s say you talk for 20 minutes. During this time, the circuit is continuously open between the two phones. In the early phone system, up until 1960 or so, every call had to have a dedicated wire stretching from one end of the call to the other for the duration of the call. So if you were in London and you wanted to call Manchester, the switches between London and Manchester would connect pieces of copper wire all the way across the United Kingdom. You would use all those pieces of wire just for your call for the full 20 minutes. You paid a lot for the call, because you actually owned a 220-mile-long copper wire for 20 minutes.
Telephone conversations over today’s traditional phone network are somewhat more efficient and they cost a lot less. Your voice is digitized and your voice along with thousands of others can be combined onto a single fiber optic cable for much of the journey (there’s still a dedicated piece of copper wire going into your home though). These calls are transmitted at a fixed rate of 64 kilobits per second (Kbps) in each direction, for a total transmission rate of 128 Kbps. Since there are 8 kilobits (Kb) in a kilobyte (KB), this translates to a transmission of 16 KB each second the circuit is open, and 960 KB every minute it’s open. In a 20-minute conversation, the total transmission is 19,200 KB, which is roughly equal to 20 megabytes If you look at a typical phone conversation, much of this transmitted data is wasted.

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User Demand

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Bandwidth requirements are going through the roof with increasing user demands. Trends today are fast growing towards the new technologies and the api market which means more bandwidth is required to share video, download music and a array of office tools for those on the move. The stats are building up and so are the demands. This is why Nvirocom is in a great position with this explosive market to help meet just some of these demands. The question is how far will we push it with our technologies before the demand cannot be met. Lets hope never but we need more companies like Nvirocom to push and place networks to be sure of this.

Moroccan switch

Today 11th july 2011 our moroccan switch has gone live. We have had great success with its output and can offer 80% ASR 4 min ACD. This in the telecoms world are amazing stats and we intend to keep up the level of service throughout the whole network we are building.

Nvirocom Telecoms

Nvircom Ltd is a telecommunications company born to create Eco friendly networks and to lower user costs. We are keen to find the latest technologies which are designed to lower costs, higher productivity and put them into practice so we invite anyone to talk to us about new ideas and what advantages they may bring. We also like to keep a keen eye on what’s happening within the environment and as with our network and servers we are always looking to find alternative energy to do our bit to lowering our Co2 footprint.

VoIP part 2: Using it

VoIP phone users can make calls from anywhere there’s a broadband connection.
Chances are good you’re already making VoIP calls any time you place a long-distance call. Phone companies use VoIP to streamline their networks. By routing thousands of phone calls via a circuit switch and into an IP gateway, they can seriously reduce the bandwidth they’re using for the long haul. Once the call is received by a gateway on the other side of the call, it’s decompressed, reassembled and routed to a local circuit switch.
Although it will take some time, you can be sure that eventually all of the current circuit-switched networks will be replaced with packet-switching technology. IP telephony just makes sense, in terms of both economics and infrastructure requirements. More and more businesses are installing VoIP systems with Nvirocom, and the technology will continue to grow in popularity as it makes its way into our homes. Perhaps the biggest draws to VoIP for the home users that are making the switch are price and flexibility.
With VoIP, you can make a call from anywhere you have broadband connectivity. Since the IP phones or ATAs broadcast their info over the Internet, they can be administered by the provider anywhere there’s a connection. So business travelers can take their phones or ATAs with them on trips and always have access to their home phone. Another alternative is the softphone. A softphone is client software that loads the VoIP service onto your desktop or laptop. May soft-phones have an interface on your screen that looks like a traditional telephone. As long as you have a headset/microphone, you can place calls from your laptop anywhere in the broadband-connected world.
We (nvirocom) are offering minute-rate plans structured like cell phone bills for as little as £20 per month. On the higher end, some offer unlimited plans for as little as £50 a month which is a great option for heavy users. With the elimination of unregulated charges and the suite of free features that are included with these plans, it can be quite a savings.
Most VoIP companies provide the features that normal phone companies charge extra for when they are added to your service plan.
VoIP includes:
• Caller ID
• Call waiting
• Call transfer
• Repeat dial
• Return call
• Three-way calling

There are also advanced call-filtering options available from some carriers. These features use caller ID information to allow you make a choice about how calls from a particular number are handled.
You can:
• Forward the call to a particular number
• Send the call directly to voice mail
• Give the caller a busy signal
• Play a “not-in-service” message
• Send the caller to a funny rejection hotline

With many VoIP services, you can also check voice mail via the Web or attach messages to an e-mail that is sent to your computer or handheld. Not all VoIP services offer all of the features above. Prices and services vary, so if you’re interested, it’s best to do a little shopping.

VoIP part 1: How Does Work?

For anyone unsure about how Voip works I will attempt to enlighten you.

If you are unaware of VoIP, brace yourself for the way you think about your phone calls. VoIP, an abbreviation for Voice over Internet Protocol, is a way of communicating over the internet as opposed to a analogue landline phone.
How is this useful? VoIP can turn a standard Internet connection into a way to place free or very inexpensive phone calls. The practical part of this is that by utilising some of the free VoIP software that is available to make phone calls via the internet, you’re bypassing the phone company (and its charges) entirely.
VoIP is a revolutionary technology that has the potential to completely rework the world’s phone systems.
Above all else, VoIP is basically going to “reinvent the wheel.” In this article, we’ll explore the principles behind VoIP, its applications and the potential of this emerging technology, which will more than likely one day replace the traditional phone system entirely which Nvirocom can assist with.
The interesting thing about VoIP is that there is not just one way to place a call. There are three different ways of VoIP service in common use today:

ATA — The simplest and most common way is through the use of a device called an ATA (analog telephone adaptor). The ATA allows you to connect a standard phone to your computer or your Internet connection for use with VoIP. The ATA is an analog-to-digital converter. It takes the analog signal from your traditional phone and converts it into digital data for transmission over the Internet. Providers like Vonage and AT&T CallVantage are bundling ATAs free with their service. You simply crack the ATA out of the box, plug the cable from your phone that would normally go in the wall socket into the ATA, and you’re ready to make VoIP calls. Some ATAs may ship with additional software that is loaded onto the host computer to configure it; but in any case, it’s a very straightforward setup.
IP Phones — These specialized phones look just like normal phones with a handset, cradle and buttons. But instead of having the standard RJ-11 phone connectors, IP phones have an RJ-45Ethernet connector. IP phones connect directly to your router and have all the hardware and software necessary right onboard to handle the IP call. Wi-Fi phones allow subscribing callers to make VoIP calls from any Wi-Fi hot spot.
Computer-to-computer — This is certainly the easiest way to use VoIP. You don’t even have to pay for long-distance calls. There are several companies offering free or very low-cost software that you can use for this type of VoIP. All you need is the software, a microphone, speakers, a sound card and an Internet connection, preferably a fast one like you would get through a cable or DSL modem. Except for your normal monthly ISP fee, there is usually no charge for computer-to-computer calls, no matter the distance.